Photos: Crane & Co.’s American Flags

We’re quite proud of the fact that we’re an American company making products in America. It’s what we were founded on and what we hope to continue to do for centuries to come.

It isn’t uncommon, then, to see lovely and plentiful displays of patriotism as one wanders through our factories. Below are just a handful of such displays we think you might enjoy perusing, especially as we go into Memorial Day Weekend. Go ahead, hum “You’re a Grand Old Flag” while you do…

1) Red, White & Blue With a View

crane and co. factory american flag Continue reading

From the Archives: Presidential Stationery

This post is the first in a new series we’re calling “From the Archives.” We’ve been the choice of stationery for presidents and princes, dignitaries and duchesses, starlets and CEOs. We like to think this is the case because not only have we been making fine papers since 1801, but also because of our commitment to classic craftsmanship and attention to detail. As we like to say, when it’s Crane, it’s right.

Many people don’t know that we have often printed the stationery, invitations and announcements for the White House. So we thought we would highlight a selection of our favorites here. Take a look, and feel fee to envision yourself receiving one of these in the post box. We know we did.

  • A Presidential dinner invitation

Continue reading

In Celebration Of: The Monogram

engraved monogram detail final“A striking monogram, combining the first letters of the full name or the first and last name is an enviable possession,” wrote Jean Wilde Clark in A Desk Book on the Etiquette of Social Stationery.

The book was printed by Eaton, Crane (yes, that Crane) and Pike in 1910. However, the monogram is still a possession envied — one that, in the age of e-communication, is as coveted as ever.

It is with this modern day appreciation that we take a look back at the history of the monogram — an art form most near and dear to Crane & Co.’s social stationery heart.
Continue reading

Crane & Co. and America: Our Made-in-the-U.S.A. History

Give Us Liberty

crane & co. liberty paper mill

Liberty Paper Mill.

More than 200 years ago, Stephen Crane decided to make a statement. And it wasn’t with his fashion forward breeches or well-groomed mutton chops. It was, rather, with the name of a paper mill he opened in 1770. He called it the Liberty Paper Mill and, for purveyors of our American heritage, was named so just two years after the British occupied Boston. – and just five miles away. A tres bold move, if we do say so ourselves.

Continue reading

In Celebration Of: The Pen

Antony and Cleopatra. Romeo and Juliet. Scarlett and Rhett.

We love a good love story.

But our favorite is that of Pen and Paper.

Thus, we were delighted to pick the brain of Rick Propas — a specialist for Swann Auction Galleries, where he directs the newly created Department of Fine and Vintage Writing Instruments — whose first pen was given to him more than 50 years ago.

Rick Propas, lefty.

“In the Jewish tradition, it’s customary to give a boy a fountain pen at his bar mitzvah,” Propas explained. “I didn’t get one, and when I complained to my dad, he pulled out his own pen and gave it to me.”

Propas has been collecting vintage pens ever since.

Continue reading

In Celebration Of: Engraving

gold engraved calligraphy calling cardThere is something exquisitely special about an engraved piece of stationery. Just ask any fan of Downton Abbey or, well, anyone who is reading this blog right now.

Whether one considers a handwritten note or invitation a nostalgic luxury he or she refuses to give up, or simply a staple of any proper stationery wardrobe, all would agree that engraving is the grande dame of printing processes.

And so, we went on a mission to piece together the history of engraving. There is, we found, quite a bit of information available on the engraving of images, which goes back a long, long time: cavemen did it; so did the Egyptians.

But we were more curious about that point in history when someone thought, My, wouldn’t this piece of paper that I’m sending look so much lovelier engraved?

Continue reading

Crane & Co. Heritage: Our Little Story

Presidential stationeryWe’re quite proud of our heritage here at Crane & Co. A family-owned company that started as a little paper mill in Massachusetts during the American Revolution. Paul Revere used our paper, Presidents galore have used it and the U.S. Government still uses it. Celebrities past and present (a proper paper company never tells), society’s creme de la creme, Fortune 500 companies — our paper makes a statement, which is why it’s so revered.

But one doesn’t have to possess a famous last name to appreciate the finest paper. On the contrary, one simply needs to recognize and appreciate the beauty of classic correspondence. Which is probably the case if you’re reading this.

And which is probably why you just might enjoy watching a little story about our heritage. Enjoy!