Photos: Crane & Co.’s American Flags

We’re quite proud of the fact that we’re an American company making products in America. It’s what we were founded on and what we hope to continue to do for centuries to come.

It isn’t uncommon, then, to see lovely and plentiful displays of patriotism as one wanders through our factories. Below are just a handful of such displays we think you might enjoy perusing, especially as we go into Memorial Day Weekend. Go ahead, hum “You’re a Grand Old Flag” while you do…

1) Red, White & Blue With a View

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Crane & Co. and America: Our Made-in-the-U.S.A. History

Give Us Liberty

crane & co. liberty paper mill

Liberty Paper Mill.

More than 200 years ago, Stephen Crane decided to make a statement. And it wasn’t with his fashion forward breeches or well-groomed mutton chops. It was, rather, with the name of a paper mill he opened in 1770. He called it the Liberty Paper Mill and, for purveyors of our American heritage, was named so just two years after the British occupied Boston. – and just five miles away. A tres bold move, if we do say so ourselves.

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The Making Of: Our New Americana Collection

In this edition of The Making Of, we take a look at yet another one of our new collections (my, our design team has been busy).

Patriot meets pen in a premier collection celebrating all things red, white and blue. We’re calling it — drum roll, pleaseAmericana. And what better time to launch it than while we’re all dreaming of fireworks and BBQs?

First, there was Inspiration.

americana stationery collection inspiration“This collection came together as I was going over the archives,” recalls VP of Creative & Product Development Rachel V. Ivey. “I noticed that Crane was present for every Presidency. With an election approaching, developing a collection that celebrates our country was a pleasure.”

Next, the team thought about Americana’s target customer, and came up with three types:

  • The Classic American, who loves rich history.
  • The Proud American, who isn’t afraid to wear her U.S.A. love on her sleeve.
  • The Young American, who is learning how to become more involved in his country.

Finally, it was time to think design.

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Crane & Co. Heritage: Our Little Story

Presidential stationeryWe’re quite proud of our heritage here at Crane & Co. A family-owned company that started as a little paper mill in Massachusetts during the American Revolution. Paul Revere used our paper, Presidents galore have used it and the U.S. Government still uses it. Celebrities past and present (a proper paper company never tells), society’s creme de la creme, Fortune 500 companies — our paper makes a statement, which is why it’s so revered.

But one doesn’t have to possess a famous last name to appreciate the finest paper. On the contrary, one simply needs to recognize and appreciate the beauty of classic correspondence. Which is probably the case if you’re reading this.

And which is probably why you just might enjoy watching a little story about our heritage. Enjoy!

American Craftsmanship: A Q&A With A Modern Day Patriot

crane & co. engraving machine

One of Crane & Co.’s engraving machines, where workers personalize each piece of stationery. Some of the machines are more than 100 years old.

As a 200-year-old paper company that still calls the same New England town home after all these years, there are two things we here at Crane & Co. put at the top of our ‘important’ list: Writing (without it, we wouldn’t exist) and Americana (since 1801, remember?).

So we were quite excited to hear that a Seattle lawyer with a penchant for all things American was writing a book on businesses born and raised right here in the U.S.A., including little old us. It’s called Simply American: Putting Our Extended American Family Back to Work, and while a date hasn’t been set yet for publication, we decided to chat with the author, John Briggs, about everything from brooms and sneakers to the American Dream.

What inspired you to write this book?
Chronic unemployment in this country. We’ve had this alleged recovery, but we’re not getting people back to work. I started thinking about unemployment, and what struck me is we could create a lot of jobs in manufacturing. A simple errand started my thinking in this direction.
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