In Celebration Of: Engraving

gold engraved calligraphy calling cardThere is something exquisitely special about an engraved piece of stationery. Just ask any fan of Downton Abbey or, well, anyone who is reading this blog right now.

Whether one considers a handwritten note or invitation a nostalgic luxury he or she refuses to give up, or simply a staple of any proper stationery wardrobe, all would agree that engraving is the grande dame of printing processes.

And so, we went on a mission to piece together the history of engraving. There is, we found, quite a bit of information available on the engraving of images, which goes back a long, long time: cavemen did it; so did the Egyptians.

But we were more curious about that point in history when someone thought, My, wouldn’t this piece of paper that I’m sending look so much lovelier engraved?

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Stationery vs. Stationary

Ladies and gentlemen, your grammar lesson for the day:

She remained stationary as a matter of principle. She gave stationery as a gift to her principal.

Homophones can be tricky. But while one should always strive to use the proper form for all words sounding the same yet meaning different things, the one nearest and dearest to our heart is stationery versus stationary.

Stationary, according to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, means “standing still” or “not moving.”

Stationery, according to the same source, means “writing paper” and “writing materials, as in notepads, pens, pencils, paper and envelopes.”

One shouldn’t feel too bad about confusing these two common words. In fact, they were once the same word and shared the same spelling. In the 1700s, “stationery wares” were sold by “stationers,” i.e. booksellers who did not travel all about, but stayed in one place to sell their wares. They were frequently booksellers who also sold writing wares. Somehow, the spellings diverged into stationery (meaning writing ware) and stationary (meaning fixed and unable to move).

A common school house trick for remembering the proper spelling is to remember that station-ery means pap-er.

Have more questions about etiquette? Email our Crane Concierge at concierge@crane.com.

In Celebration Of: The Calling Card

Pearl White Calling Card with Dotted RuleSpeakeasy-inspired cocktails. Old fashioned shaves. British aristocracy. What’s old is new again, and, as purveyors of classic correspondence, we are quite delighted about this trend toward slowing down.

And so in the spirit of stopping to smell the roses, today we’d like to celebrate the calling card.

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Wedding Etiquette: Anniversary Gifts & Reaffirming Vows

220 Lb Lettra PaperANNIVERSARY GIFTS

The Victorians, with their penchant for classifying everything, created a list of symbolic wedding anniversary gifts that is still very much in vogue today.

Here are the traditional anniversary gifts for each year:

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Etiquette: Building Your Social Stationery Wardrobe

engraved monogram detailAs with the clothes you wear, the stationery you use makes a statement. When you create and assemble your “stationery wardrobe,” keep in mind the impression you hope to make. Your stationery should reflect both your personality and the type of correspondence you’re sending.

With that in mind, there are three questions you should ask yourself when creating your perfect stationery wardrobe. Let’s dive in, shall we?

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Etiquette: Professional Stationery

Stationery Wardrobe Essentials

Some say the clothes make the man. We like to say the stationery makes the man. And woman, of course.

There are many types of stationery that you might wish to include in your corporate stationery wardrobe. These items range from the basics, such as your corporate letterhead and business cards, to the more personal, such as correspondence cards and jotter cards.

Many professionals start with the basics and add other items as their business grows or as their needs increase. Below are our suggestions for building the perfect professional stationery wardrobe.
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Wedding Etiquette: The Invitational Line

catholic wedding invitationThe tradition of the bride’s parents sending out the wedding invitations (along with the tradition of the bride’s father giving away the bride) have their origins in the days when the bride’s father made the marriage arrangements for his daughter by negotiating the size of her dowry.

Today, the traditions continue with the bride’s family customarily hosting the wedding. But it’s not as easy as “Mr. and Mrs.”

Below we answer some of the most common questions brides have about how her parents’ names should appear on the wedding invitations. Of course, a bride’s parents will not always be present, which we cover below, too.

And now, some Q&A’s:
Where on the invitation should my parents’ names appear?
My father is a medical doctor. Does he use his title?
My mother is a medical doctor, but my father is not. How is that worded?
Both of my parents are medical doctors. How do their names read?
My mother kept her maiden name. How should my parents’ names read?
My father/mother has a Ph.D. Does he/she use “Doctor” on my wedding invitations?
My father is a minister. How should my parents’ names read?
My mother is a minister but my father is not. How do their names read?
My father is a judge. Does he use “The Honorable”?
My mother is a judge but my father is not. How is that indicated?
My parents are separated. Should they send my invitations together?
My fiancé and I are paying for the wedding. How is that indicated?
My father dislikes his middle name. Is it proper to use his middle initial?
My father’s middle name is just an initial. Is it proper to use his initial?
One of my parents is a widow, can I still include my deceased parent on the invitation?
When is it appropriate to use “senior”?
My mother is a widow who has not remarried. She prefers the use of her first name. Can her name read “Mrs. Mary Chance Forrester”?
My father passed away last year, and I’d like to include his name on my wedding invitations. How is that done?
Both my parents are deceased, who should issue my invitations?
What if I’m not close with any of my relatives?
Can my groom’s parents issue the invitations?

Where on the invitation should my parents’ names appear?
The first line of the wedding invitations.

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My father is a medical doctor. Does he use his title?
Medical doctors do use their professional titles. “Doctor” should be written out, but may be abbreviated to “Dr.” if your father’s name is exceptionally long.

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