Etiquette: Building Your Social Stationery Wardrobe

IMG_7910As with the clothes you wear, the stationery you use makes a statement. When you create and assemble your “stationery wardrobe,” keep in mind the impression you hope to make. Your stationery should reflect both your personality and the type of correspondence you’re sending.

With that in mind, there are three questions you should ask yourself when creating your perfect stationery wardrobe. Let’s dive in, shall we?

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Etiquette: Professional Stationery

Stationery Wardrobe Essentials

Some say the clothes make the man. We like to say the stationery makes the man. And woman, of course.

There are many types of stationery that you might wish to include in your corporate stationery wardrobe. These items range from the basics, such as your corporate letterhead and business cards, to the more personal, such as correspondence cards and jotter cards.

Many professionals start with the basics and add other items as their business grows or as their needs increase. Below are our suggestions for building the perfect professional stationery wardrobe.
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Wedding Etiquette: Assembling the Invitations

Channel your inner Lucy and get ready for some chocolate factory-style fun. Hopefully minus the mishaps, of course.

ORDER OF ENCLOSURES

engraved wedding invitationFor the most part, wedding invitations are assembled in size order. The invitation itself is first. The enclosure cards are stacked on top of the invitations, not inside. The reception card is placed on top of the invitation. Then the reply envelope is placed face down on the reception card. The reply card is slipped face up beneath the flap of the reply envelope.

Any other enclosures are added face up in size order (usually at-home card, directions card, accommodation card, pew card, etc.). The single-fold invitation and its enclosures are placed into the inside envelope with the fold of the invitation at the bottom of the envelope and the engraving facing the back of the envelope. You can tell whether or not you stuffed the envelope correctly by removing the invitation with your right hand. If you can read the invitation without turning it, it was stuffed correctly.

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Wedding Invitation Etiquette: A Line By Line Guide


The Groom’s Name
Joining Word
Request Line
Location
Street Address
Time
Year
City & State
Personalized Invitations

THE INVITATIONAL LINE

letterpress wedding invitationThe tradition of the bride’s parents sending out the wedding invitations (along with the tradition of the bride’s father giving away the bride) have their origins in the days when the bride’s father made the marriage arrangements for his daughter by negotiating the size of her dowry.

Today, the traditions continue with the bride’s family customarily hosting the wedding. But it’s not as easy as “Mr. and Mrs.”

How to present who is issuing the wedding invitations can be complex, which is why we have an entire section dedicated to the Invitational Line.

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Wedding Etiquette: Events Before the Big Day

pink die cut engagement announcementYou’re engaged: Mazel Tov! Felicidades! Congratulations! Now, let’s celebrate. Though your wedding day will undoubtedly be the crowning event of much anticipation and planning, a day you and your future husband will never forget, the events leading up to it can be just as exciting. Well, almost.


Engagement Party
Meeting Your Fiancé
Save the Date Cards
The Bridal Shower
Bridal Tea
Rehearsal Dinner

Engagement Announcements

He proposed. You said yes. Let’s get down to business. Quite appropriately, you may want to share your excitement with others by officially announcing it (and we don’t mean via Facebook & Twitter). The announcement is traditionally made by your parents as soon after the engagement as possible. While there are no strict rules regarding the wording of engagement announcements, they are usually pretty straightforward.

While you may think of calling it a day after including an announcement in the local newspaper, note that they only reach those people who subscribe to that paper. If you want to make sure all of your friends and family members find out about your engagement, you need to send announcements — or make a lot of phone calls.

Similarly, while updating your Facebook status to “engaged” is easy and an efficient way to share the big news, you’re announcing your upcoming marriage, not what you had for lunch. Such a huge milestone certainly deserves a proper and formal announcement.

If you are worried sending an engagement announcement will make people think you are soliciting presents, know that the announcement not a request for a gift. It’s simply intended to announce an event — your engagement. Those receiving an announcement should not feel obligated to send a gift.

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Wedding Invitation Etiquette: Religious & Cultural Customs

catholic wedding invitationLove. Amore. Amore. Amour. There are oh so many ways to say love. So it isn’t surprising that there are oh so many ways to get married.

Below, we cover the invitation etiquette for several different cultures, religions and customs. Because while the end result is the same, how the bride and groom get there is a unique and special experience as individual as a snowflake. Except so much more romantic.

Roman Catholic Weddings
Jewish Weddings
Mormon Weddings
Hispanic Weddings
Military Weddings
Double Weddings
Second Marriages

Roman Catholic Weddings

The Roman Catholic Church requires the posting of banns, the public announcement of a couple’s intentions to marry. The banns must be announced from the pulpit or in the church bulletin three times before the wedding. The traditional posting of the banns was the forerunner of today’s wedding announcements.

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Wedding Etiquette: The Invitational Line

catholic wedding invitationThe tradition of the bride’s parents sending out the wedding invitations (along with the tradition of the bride’s father giving away the bride) have their origins in the days when the bride’s father made the marriage arrangements for his daughter by negotiating the size of her dowry.

Today, the traditions continue with the bride’s family customarily hosting the wedding. But it’s not as easy as “Mr. and Mrs.”

Below we answer some of the most common questions brides have about how her parents’ names should appear on the wedding invitations. Of course, a bride’s parents will not always be present, which we cover below, too.

And now, some Q&A’s:
Where on the invitation should my parents’ names appear?
My father is a medical doctor. Does he use his title?
My mother is a medical doctor, but my father is not. How is that worded?
Both of my parents are medical doctors. How do their names read?
My mother kept her maiden name. How should my parents’ names read?
My father/mother has a Ph.D. Does he/she use “Doctor” on my wedding invitations?
My father is a minister. How should my parents’ names read?
My mother is a minister but my father is not. How do their names read?
My father is a judge. Does he use “The Honorable”?
My mother is a judge but my father is not. How is that indicated?
My parents are separated. Should they send my invitations together?
My fiancé and I are paying for the wedding. How is that indicated?
My father dislikes his middle name. Is it proper to use his middle initial?
My father’s middle name is just an initial. Is it proper to use his initial?
One of my parents is a widow, can I still include my deceased parent on the invitation?
When is it appropriate to use “senior”?
My mother is a widow who has not remarried. She prefers the use of her first name. Can her name read “Mrs. Mary Chance Forrester”?
My father passed away last year, and I’d like to include his name on my wedding invitations. How is that done?
Both my parents are deceased, who should issue my invitations?
What if I’m not close with any of my relatives?
Can my groom’s parents issue the invitations?

Where on the invitation should my parents’ names appear?
The first line of the wedding invitations.

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My father is a medical doctor. Does he use his title?
Medical doctors do use their professional titles. “Doctor” should be written out, but may be abbreviated to “Dr.” if your father’s name is exceptionally long.

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