Stationery with a Story: Introducing Our Signet Collection

Our iconic Signet Collection is inspired by classic symbolism. While the words you provide will certainly inspire, one should never shy away from stationery with a story.

Pineapple: A symbol of hospitality, the pineapple was once considered quite the commodity. Had you been a member of the New England elite or a sailor home from duty, the exotic fruit was often displayed proudly at home. We like to think it still is — in the form of a thoughtful note to the gracious hostess or new neighbor.

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Wheat: A symbol of bounty and prosperity, a bushel of wheat is often referred to as ‘giving grain.’ While it is said that the giving of such grain was the impetus for the wedding cake, a message coupled with such a motif is certainly appropriate for any occasion. Frosting excluded, of course.

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Palm Branches: A symbol of victory, palm branches were often given to winners of prestigious games and military battles in Rome. Thus, such an image is the perfect accompaniment to a note of congratulations for a diploma or promotion well deserved.

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Gingko: A symbol of strength and longevity, the gingko tree has rightly earned such notoriety by its ability to often live for 1,000 years. Thus, a note to a friend in need of an encouraging word is surely the perfect pairing for this spirited motif.

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This entry was posted in Engraving, Fall, Heritage and tagged , , by craneandco. Bookmark the permalink.

About craneandco

More than 200 years ago, Stephen Crane decided to make a statement. And it wasn’t with his fashion forward breeches or well-groomed mutton chops. It was with his Liberty Paper Mill, named so just two years after the British occupied Boston – and just five miles away. A tres bold move, if we do say so ourselves. Today, Crane & Co. still calls Dalton home, our 100 percent cotton paper still incites swoons, and we’re still making bold statements. Still not with breeches.

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